« Asia and the Pacific


No dates are currently scheduled.

Description 

The goal of this micro-credential is to provide a broad, practitioner-oriented introduction to evidence-based policy with a precise geographic focus on the Pacific. What is evidence-based policy? How should policy-makers weigh different types of evidence in their decision making? What data and evidence is available in the Pacific, and how should it be interpreted? How does Pacific migration affect communities left behind? How does increasing state capacity, for example through more police officers after civil conflict, affect power inequalities between men and women? We do not answer these questions with anecdotes and abstract theory. This is an empirical course and this micro-credential will offer answers to these important questions through applied case studies with detailed survey data and concrete examples. Over the micro-credential, enrollees will be brought from a gentle introduction to the key ideas in causal inference up to the frontier of research and policy practice. The micro-credential is designed to not require any prerequisites, but a quantitative social science background (e.g., economics) may be helpful and students should expect to engage with challenging, state-of-the-art quantitative research. It should be of interest to those with an interest in policy or the region, and those with an interest in development economics and development studies more broadly.

Case Studies presented in this micro-credential will be selected from the following list:

  • Cases in labour economics: early child hood education (PEARL)
  • Cases in labour economics: the Recognised Seasonal Employer (RSE) program
  • Cases in labour economics: brain gain in Fiji
  • Cases in labour economics: long term migration from the Pacific
  • Cases in governance and the state: community-driven development in the Solomon Islands
  • Cases in governance and the state: improving tax compliance in Papua New Guinea
  • Cases in governance and the state: policing and gender inequality in Papua New Guinea

Topics 

  1. The credibility revolution and evidence-based policy
  2. Data in the Pacific and statistical preliminaries
  3. Policy and program evaluation—experimental and non-experimental techniques

Learning outcomes 

Upon successful completion, enrollees will have the knowledge and skills to: 

  1. Be aware of the different types of empirical evidence available for policy
  2. Understand key differences between different types of causal evidence
  3. Read, interpret, and evaluate empirical development studies
  4. Be familiar with key topics in Pacific development and the latest research on them
  5. Appreciate the role of empirical research in improving policy and development outcomes

Indicative assessment

One-page Policy Brief, including an impact evaluation design (60%); Links to LO: 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5

Critical Review / Referee Report of research paper (20%); Links to LO: 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5

Presentation of Research Paper (40%); Links to LO: 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5

Assumed knowledge 

Familiarity with or at least willingness to understand data, statistics, graphs, tables, basic economic theory, and challenging research papers are all important.

This Micro-credential is taught at graduate level and assumes the generic skills of a Bachelors or equivalent. 

Micro-credential stack information 

 This Micro-credential is currently not part of a stack.

Details 

  • Course Code: DPA14

  • Workload: Contact hours: 12 hours, face-to-face or online (eg via Zoom). Individual study and assessment: approx. 50-60 hours.

  • ANU unit value: 3 units

  • Course Code Level: 8000

  • Contact:  ANU Department of Pacific Affairs: dpa@anu.edu.au

This Micro-credential is taught at a graduate level.  This is not an AQF qualification. 

No dates are currently scheduled.

Description 

This micro-credential sets out models and examines the experience of the Pacific island economies. It links both models and experience to economic theory. It asks which models do a better job of explaining economic performance in the Pacific, and which provide a better guide to the future. It is designed to be useful both for those with an economics background, and for those without. It should be of interest to those who work or will work on the Pacific, but also for those with an interest in development economics, and its application to this region of the world.

Topics 

  1. Economic development - overview
  2. Unique features of the Pacific - and variation within the Pacific
  3. Models of the Pacific: geography v institutions
  4. Pacific economic trajectories
  5. Aid and the Pacific
  6. Economic reform and the Pacific
  7. Governance and the Pacific
  8. Tourism and the Pacific
  9. Fisheries and the Pacific
  10. Labour mobility and the Pacific

Learning outcomes 

Upon successful completion, enrollees will have the knowledge and skills to: 

  1. Apply theories of economic development to the Pacific
  2. Be aware of key economic debates in relation to the Pacific
  3. Understand major Pacific economic trends and profiles
  4. Be familiar with key topics of central importance to the Pacific

Indicative assessment

Research essay on a policy topic of relevance to the Pacific (1500 words) 60%; Links to LO: 1,2,3 and 4

Country brief (1500 words) 40%; Links to LO: 1,2,3 and 4

Assumed knowledge 

This Micro-credential is taught at graduate level and assumes the generic skills of a Bachelors or equivalent. 

Micro-credential stack information 

 This Micro-credential is currently not part of a stack.

Details 

  • Course Code: DPA11

  • Workload: Contact hours: 12 hours, face-to-face or online (eg via Zoom). Individual study and assessment: approx. 50-60 hours.

  • ANU unit value: 3 units

  • Course Code Level: 8000

  • Contact:  ANU Department of Pacific Affairs: dpa@anu.edu.au

This Micro-credential is taught at a graduate level.  This is not an AQF qualification. 

No dates are currently scheduled.

Description 

This micro-credential examines the complexities of Pacific labour mobility in the 21st Century. The micro-credential draws on international literature of labour migration, as well as historical and contemporary labour migration to Australia from the Pacific. The micro-credential considers views from various stakeholders such as governments, employers, workers, families and communities and provides a holistic view of labour mobility policies from Australia for the Pacific island and Timor-Leste. This will include examining bi-lateral arrangements and trade agreements in the region such as PACER Plus. It examines key policy objectives, and considers if they are met/unmet through case-study examples. Labour mobility has become a key component in our relationship within the region. However, these schemes are always evolving with new dimensions arising overtime. This micro-credential will involve discussions the debates regarding labour mobility and its role in potential development outcomes for both Australia and the Pacific region (including Timor-Leste).

Topics 

  1. International Labour mobility policies
  2. Relationships between Australia and partner governments, trade agreements and bilateral arrangements
  3. How labour mobility works in practice – viewpoints of multiple stakeholders
  4. Remittances and the migration-development nexus
  5. Social and economic -Intended and unintended positive and negative consequences of labour mobility
  6. Impacts of COVID-19 and future migration pathways

Learning outcomes 

Upon successful completion, enrollees will have the knowledge and skills to: 

  1. Demonstrate knowledge in regards to why these policies exist, what their operational practices are, how they affect those who participate in them and future migration pathways
  2. Critically assess the importance and relevance of labour migration for various stakeholders
  3. Understand concepts related to the migration- development debates and how they are relevant to contemporary Pacific labour mobility programs
  4. Evaluate and communicate ideas about these new and evolving policies ensuring they maintain their internationally standings as “best practice” models

Indicative assessment

Research essay on the significance of labour mobility for Australia and the Pacific region (incl Timor-Leste) (2000 words) 60%; Links to LO: 1, 2, 3 and 4

Policy brief on an issue(1000 words) 40%; Links to LO: 1, 2, 3 and 4

Assumed knowledge 

This Micro-credential is taught at graduate level and assumes the generic skills of a Bachelors or equivalent. 

Micro-credential stack information 

 This Micro-credential is currently not part of a stack.

Details 

  • Course Code: DPA15

  • Workload: Contact hours: 12 hours, face-to-face or online (eg via Zoom). Individual study and assessment: approx. 50-60 hours.

  • ANU unit value: 3 units

  • Course Code Level: 8000

  • Contact:  ANU Department of Pacific Affairs: dpa@anu.edu.au

This Micro-credential is taught at a graduate level.  This is not an AQF qualification. 

No dates are currently scheduled.

Description 

This micro-credential examines the experience of Papua New Guinea, by far the largest economy in the Pacific, and Australia's closest neighbour. Understanding the PNG economy is important (a) for understanding PNG (b) for strategic reasons, given PNG's importance and (c) for a good understanding of development economics, given PNG's unique economic structure and trajectory. The micro-credential takes a model-based, data-based and history-based approach to understanding PNG's economic past, present and future. It is designed to be useful both for those with an economics background, and for those without. It should be of interest to those who work or will work in PNG, but also for those with an interest in development economics.

Topics 

  1. PNG's economy - an introduction
  2. Economic models for understanding PNG
  3. PNG economic time series
  4. Pre-independence PNG
  5. The early years of independence
  6. The 90s: crisis and reform
  7. PNG and the resource boom
  8. PNG today: after the boom
  9. PNG and governance
  10. PNG and economic reform

Learning outcomes 

Upon successful completion, enrollees will have the knowledge and skills to: 

  1. Apply theories of economic development to PNG.
  2. Be aware of key economic debates in relation to PNG
  3. Understand PNG's economic history
  4. Be familiar with key topics of importance to the contemporary PNG economy

Indicative assessment

Research essay on an aspect of the PNG economy (1500 words) 60%; Links to LO: 1,2,3 and 4

PNG economic policy brief (1500 words) 40%; Links to LO: 1,2,3 and 4

Assumed knowledge 

Familiarity with or at least willingness to read graphs and tables important.

This Micro-credential is taught at graduate level and assumes the generic skills of a Bachelors or equivalent. 

Micro-credential stack information 

 This Micro-credential is currently not part of a stack.

Details 

  • Course Code: DPA12

  • Workload: Contact hours: 12 hours, face-to-face or online (eg via Zoom). Individual study and assessment: approx. 50-60 hours.

  • ANU unit value: 3 units

  • Course Code Level: 8000

  • Contact:  ANU Department of Pacific Affairs: dpa@anu.edu.au

This Micro-credential is taught at a graduate level.  This is not an AQF qualification.