« Asia and the Pacific


No dates are currently scheduled.

Description 

This micro-credential is designed for current and prospective policy makers and aid professionals involved in the design and implementation of aid projects in the Pacific. Adopting an evidence-based and multi-disciplinary approach, it examines critically the challenges of aid programming in the Pacific context. Beginning with an assessment of the political and development context in the region, the credential considers how the Pacific context complicates key elements of the design and implementation process including: partnering with local actors, developing a context responsive theory of change, monitoring and evaluation, risk management and inclusivity. The micro-credential has a strong practical focus based around four Pacific case studies in the areas of governance, gender, health and education.

Topics 

  1. The political and development context in the Pacific – Implications for design
  2. How change happens in a Pacific context - Theories of change
  3. Locally-led development - Partnering with local actors
  4. Monitoring and evaluation in a Pacific context
  5. Meeting donor requirements in Pacific designs - Risk management and sustainability
  6. Inclusivity in Pacific program design
  7. Program implementation in a Pacific context – Modalities and aid approaches
  8. Thinking and working politically in the Pacific – Situating donors in the Pacific context
  9. Case study – Gender and leadership
  10. Case study – Governance and elections
  11. Case study – Skills
  12. Case study - Health

Learning outcomes 

Upon successful completion, enrollees will have the knowledge and skills to: 

  1. Identify key stages and actors in program design and implementation
  2. Define the development contexts in the Pacific and their relevance to aid programming
  3. Determine the relevant drivers of the political economy in which aid programs are designed
  4. Critically assess different programming modalities used in Pacific development programs
  5. Design an original development program that is fit for purpose in a Pacific context

Indicative assessment

Problem Identification and Theory of Change critical review: 30%; Links to LO: 1, 2 and 3

Aid Design Project: 70%; Links to LO: 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5

Assumed knowledge 

This Micro-credential is taught at graduate level and assumes the generic skills of a Bachelors or equivalent. 

Micro-credential stack information 

 This Micro-credential is currently not part of a stack.

Details 

  • Course Code: DPA25

  • Workload: Contact hours: 24 hours, face-to-face or online (eg via Zoom). Individual study and assessment: approx. 100-120 hours.

  • ANU unit value: 6 units

  • Course Code Level: 8000

  • Contact:  ANU Department of Pacific Affairs: dpa@anu.edu.au

This Micro-credential is taught at a graduate level.  This is not an AQF qualification. 

No dates are currently scheduled.

Description 

This micro-credential will consider the epistemological and methodological opportunities and consequences of undertaking inclusive research in Pacific contexts. A recent trend in development research has been to work with local researchers in equitable partnerships to design and implement research projects that meaningfully resonate with them and their communities. This trend responds to a growing evidence base that research in the Pacific has mirrored colonialist frames of inquiry, without nuanced understanding of local context, and without privileging the voices of the most marginalised in those societies, including women, the disabled, and those living in remote communities. The micro-credential will present strategies to strengthen inclusivity in both the methods and content of Pacific research.

Topics 

  1. Research ethics in the Pacific: privilege, voice and standpoints
  2. Implementing inclusive research projects in the Pacific: partnerships, time, logistics, culture
  3. Inclusive research questions and topics: what is researched in the Pacific and who does it benefit?
  4. Research subjects: intersectionality and extending the sample from the ‘usual subjects’
  5. Inclusive methods for data collection and data analysis
  6. Sharing inclusive research: authorship, acknowledgement, community and policy impact

Learning outcomes 

Upon successful completion, enrollees will have the knowledge and skills to: 

  1. Identify key stages and actors in inclusive research design and implementation
  2. Explain the relationship between intersectionality and development in the Pacific, and its impact on research design
  3. Contrast inclusive and non-inclusive research methodologies in Pacific contexts
  4. Justify and support the adoption of inclusive research practices in development studies
  5. Design an original inclusive research project that is fit for purpose in a development context

Indicative assessment

Research project outline 20%: Links to LO: 1, 2, 3 and 4

Presentation of project outline 20%; Links to LO: 2 and 4

Inclusive research design document: 40%; Links to LO: 1, 2, 3, 4 and  5

Participation in class discussion 20%; Links to LO: 1, 2, 3 and 4

Assumed knowledge 

This Micro-credential is taught at graduate level and assumes the generic skills of a Bachelors or equivalent. 

Micro-credential stack information 

 This Micro-credential is currently not part of a stack.

Details 

  • Course Code: DPA22

  • Workload: Contact hours: 12 hours, face-to-face or online (eg via Zoom). Individual study and assessment: approx. 50-60 hours.

  • ANU unit value: 3 units

  • Course Code Level: 8000

  • Contact:  ANU Department of Pacific Affairs: dpa@anu.edu.au

This Micro-credential is taught at a graduate level.  This is not an AQF qualification. 

No dates are currently scheduled.

Description 

This micro-credential, an intensive Pacific negotiation masterclass, provides enrollees with first-hand exposure to the challenges of diplomatic negotiation. Enrollees will acquire and refine new negotiation skills and techniques through a variety of learning methods, including workshop discussion, demonstration, practice and simulation. The masterclass aims to develop the ability of participants to think politically and strategically about Pacific policy challenges, to examine key elements in the planning and conduct of negotiation to address these challenges in the context of Pacific politics, security and development, to identify essential qualities and skills for effective negotiation, and to consolidate this knowledge through practical exercises that simulate real-world diplomatic negotiations in and on the Pacific region.

Learning outcomes 

Upon successful completion, enrollees will have the knowledge and skills to: 

  1. Develop a strategic road-map to achieving a negotiated outcome on Pacific policy
  2. Recognise, apply and respond to different approaches to diplomatic negotiation
  3. Design negotiation strategies for a variety of different diplomatic contexts, including formal, informal, bilateral and multilateral settings

Indicative assessment

Negotiation Strategy (1,500 word outline of tactics, talking points and red lines): 30%; Links to LO: 1, 2 and 3

Negotiation Report (1,500 words): 70%; Links to LO: 1, 2 and 3

Assumed knowledge 

This Micro-credential is taught at graduate level and assumes the generic skills of a Bachelors or equivalent. 

Micro-credential stack information 

 This Micro-credential is currently not part of a stack.

Details 

  • Course Code: DPA23

  • Workload: Contact hours: 12 hours, face-to-face or online (eg via Zoom). Individual study and assessment: approx. 50-60 hours.

  • ANU unit value: 3 units

  • Course Code Level: 8000

  • Contact:  ANU Department of Pacific Affairs: dpa@anu.edu.au

This Micro-credential is taught at a graduate level.  This is not an AQF qualification. 

No dates are currently scheduled.

Description 

This micro-credential aims to develop professional knowledge of discourses and practices of indigenous research methodologies in the Pacific region. The micro-credential introduces scholarly debates on indigenous research methodologies. With a focus on the Pacific, methodologies examined and discussed in detail include Talanoa, Kaupapa Māori and Melanesian research methodologies. Other research methodologies, approaches and models from across the Pacific region are also introduced, for example the Tivaevae model from Cook Islands.

Topics 

  1. The socio-political context of research in the Pacific
  2. Melanesian research methodology
  3. Talanoa
  4. Kaupapa Māori
  5. Tivaevae model from Cook Islands and other local models
  6. How indigenous models relate to Western research models and university systems

Learning outcomes 

Upon successful completion, enrollees will have the knowledge and skills to: 

  1. Demonstrate an understanding of the socio-political context of research in the Pacific, including Pacific ways of talking, indigenous research methods and appropriate research protocols
  2. Critically reflect on methodological choices and practices relevant to the Pacific context
  3. Engage in an in-depth analysis of an indigenous research methodology

Indicative assessment

Seminar attendance and participation (10%): links to LO: 1 and 2, 3

Oral presentation on one type of indigenous research methodology (40%); links to LO: 3

Paper on Pacific research methodologies (50%); links to LO: 1 and 2

Assumed knowledge 

This Micro-credential is taught at graduate level and assumes the generic skills of a Bachelors or equivalent. 

Micro-credential stack information 

 This Micro-credential is currently not part of a stack.

Details 

  • Course Code: DPA21

  • Workload: Contact hours: 12 hours, face-to-face or online (eg via Zoom). Individual study and assessment: approx. 50-60 hours.

  • ANU unit value: 3 units

  • Course Code Level: 8000

  • Contact:  ANU Department of Pacific Affairs: dpa@anu.edu.au

This Micro-credential is taught at a graduate level.  This is not an AQF qualification. 

No dates are currently scheduled.

Description 

This micro-credential examines the political economy of elections in Melanesia (PNG, Solomon Islands, Vanuatu and Bougainville). It considers the factors shaping the conduct of elections across the region, and implications of elections on democracy, governance, development and security. Incorporating insights from comparative politics, anthropology and development studies. The micro-credential explores how elections in the region differ from developed country electoral experiences and what this means for efforts to support electoral processes. Implications for the development of electoral support programs that respond to the specific Melanesian context are also considered. The focus of the readings is to provide a deeper grounded and contextual understanding of elections, drawing heavily on applied research conducted in Melanesian countries. Regional case studies are used to elucidate key aspects of elections.

Topics 

  1. The political economy of elections in Melanesia
  2. Elections and (in)security
  3. Elections, governance and development
  4. Money politics and electoral competition in Melanesia
  5. Political parties and campaigning
  6. Elections, ICTs and social media
  7. Women and elections
  8. Electoral administration and electoral integrity in Melanesia
  9. Elections in PNG
  10. Elections in Solomon Islands
  11. Elections and external actors – interests and engagement
  12. Supporting elections in Melanesia – policy and programming challenges

Learning outcomes 

Upon successful completion, enrollees will have the knowledge and skills to: 

  1. Understand the contextual factors that condition how elections in Melanesia work
  2. Demonstrate a sophisticated understanding of the relationship between elections and security, governance, development and stability
  3. Appreciation of the challenges faced by key political and social actors such as women and civil society in participating in elections in Melanesia
  4. Demonstrate a good understanding of the policy challenges involved in administering elections in Melanesia.
  5. Appreciation of the distinctiveness of Melanesian elections in a comparative context

Indicative assessment

Risk assessment and stakeholder analysis: 30%; Links to LO: 1, 2, 4 and 5

Election support design project: 70% Links to LO: 1, 2 and 3

Assumed knowledge 

This Micro-credential is taught at graduate level and assumes the generic skills of a Bachelors or equivalent. 

Micro-credential stack information 

 This Micro-credential is currently not part of a stack.

Details 

  • Course Code: DPA24

  • Workload: Contact hours: 24 hours, face-to-face or online (eg via Zoom). Individual study and assessment: approx. 100-120 hours.

  • ANU unit value: 6 units

  • Course Code Level: 8000

  • Contact:  ANU Department of Pacific Affairs: dpa@anu.edu.au

This Micro-credential is taught at a graduate level.  This is not an AQF qualification.