The Research School of Humanities & the Arts (RSHA) is a part of the ANU College of Arts & Social Sciences (CASS). Its primary focus is on building on its established strengths in research and education across the humanities and the creative arts.

It places a strong emphasis on traditional humanities scholarship and on encouraging interdisciplinary, cross-cultural and practice-led research. The Research School also places a premium on contributing to public culture and ensuring the humanities takes its place at the centre of civil society. Researchers from CASS play a significant role in the area of public policy and in working collaboratively with national cultural institutions. The RSHA encourages innovation in the use of digital technology in research and education and in making research results available to the public.

What is auditing?

Audit students may not sit formal examinations. An Audit enrolment guarantees admission only to lectures. Attendance at lectures will under no circumstances be accepted as credit towards a degree program. Auditors may seek permission from the faculty to attend tutorials (subject to space being available), additional fees may apply.

The Centre for Continuing Education offers access to approved ANU courses for people who want to listen in to lectures without actually enrolling as a degree student. Auditors (listeners) do not generally require any special qualifications except for those courses where prerequisites are necessary - this can be ascertained by consulting the ANU website.

Auditing or "listening in" offers access to some ANU courses (lectures only).


Thu 28 Feb 2019 - Fri 31 May 2019

09:00AM

12 Sessions
3 spots remaining.

This course will introduce students to some of the major concepts, practices, and implications involved in the use of digital technologies in the humanities - the group of academic disciplines interested in examining what it means to be human from cultural, historical, and philosophical perspectives. From the vantage point of these new 'digital humanities', we will examine the contemporary shift away from a predominantly print culture to one that is increasingly digital and online, while at the same time analysing and critiquing the emerging cultural practices that accompany this development. In so doing, we will seek to better understand the historical influence of new technologies on how we think of ourselves and our cultural heritage, both individually and collectively; how we interact socially and politically; how we determine public and private spaces in an increasingly connected world; and how we can use digital technologies to produce, preserve, and study cultural materials.

Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this course, students will have the knowledge and skills to:

  • understand the implications of digital technologies for the humanities and, more generally, contemporary culture
  • analyse and critique the convergence of cultural and social practices that are emerging from the use of digital technologies;
  • formulate research questions and gather evidence from reliable sources (both digital and material) to construct informed arguments about digital culture; and
  • communicate effectively both orally and in writing, using a variety of media.

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Mon 22 Jul 2019 - Fri 25 Oct 2019

09:00AM

12 Sessions
3 spots remaining.
A revolution is underway in humanities and social science research. Information and communication technologies are transforming the way in which students and scholars approach their subject matter. New questions arise when texts, images, and sound are rearranged in ways unimaginable before the digital age. The term 'digital humanities' refers to these changes and to the critical, epistemological, and methodological challenges they pose.
 
This course provides an introduction to some of the most exciting areas in current digital humanities research, as well as an exploration of its history and impact as an interdisciplinary field, the theoretical issues it raises, and the major methodological debates it has provoked over the last few decades. Students will develop the analytical skills necessary for working at, and engaging with, the intersection of humanities and digital technologies. They will explore both the theoretical and practical foundations for working with cultural objects in the digital medium in ways relevant to languages, linguistics, history, literature, and many other humanities disciplines.No technical background is required.

Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this course, students will have the knowledge and skills to:

  • Interpret, analyse and discuss the history of and major recent theoretical developments in the interdisciplinary field of digital humanities
  • Analyse and discuss the impact of digital technologies on research in the humanities.
  • Situate research interests within the larger context of digital humanities theories, practices and projects.
  • Examine and evaluate existing digital humanities projects.

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Mon 25 Feb 2019 - Fri 31 May 2019

09:00AM

12 Sessions
3 spots remaining.

This course allows students to develop and critically assess a range of digital humanities skills, research methods, and best practices. Students will be asked to engage with cutting-edge research methodologies in the growing interdisciplinary field of the digital humanities, focusing on the issues and approaches that directly address the ongoing digitisation of our shared cultural record. The scope and scale of these issues will allow students to investigate a variety of humanities questions in a project-based manner across multiple media and using various methodologies. Students will experiment with at least four different types of data— drawn from existing open-access digital humanities collections—along with corresponding data analysis techniques to answer a set of humanities-related research questions. These methods may include: digitisation techniques, text encoding and analysis, data gathering and analysis, 'distant reading' and data mining, network analysis, data visualisation, linked open data, and geo-spatial mapping.

Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this course, students will have the knowledge and skills to:

  • analyse and discuss the impact of digital technologies on research in the humanities;
  • examine and evaluate a variety of digital humanities research methods and practices;
  • investigate the use of new digital methods in order to address a set of existing humanities research questions; and
  • effectively communicate research methodologies and results in the context of the wider digital humanities scholarly community.

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