The School of History specialises in Early Modern and Modern history, with a focus on Western history as a complement to the concentration on Classical, Asian, Pacific and Middle Eastern History elsewhere at the ANU. We offer courses that reflect both the research expertise of staff and areas of contemporary critical, intellectual and public engagement with historical issues.

What is auditing?

Auditing or "listening in" offers access to some ANU courses (lectures only).

The Centre for Continuing Education offers access to approved ANU courses for people who want to listen in to lectures without actually enrolling as a degree student. Auditors (listeners) do not generally require any special qualifications except for those courses where prerequisites are necessary - this can be ascertained by consulting the ANU website.

Audit students may not sit formal examinations. An Audit enrolment guarantees admission only to lectures. Attendance at lectures will under no circumstances be accepted as credit towards a degree program. Auditors may seek permission from the faculty to attend tutorials (subject to space being available), additional fees may apply.
No dates are currently scheduled.

‘Celebrity: An Unauthorised History’ points a telephoto lens at one of modernity’s most mesmerising and perplexing cultural phenomena: stardom. The course begins and ends in London. We will open in the eighteenth century, when David Garrick, the first superstar of the theatre, is treading the boards. The curtain closes in 1997, when the late Princess Diana becomes the focus for a world in mourning. Between those two points, this course will drive a wide arc through the interrelated worlds of politics and entertainment, reflecting on forms of celebrity in diverse cultures and contexts. Drawing from historian Fred Inglis' argument that celebrity is a ‘product of culture and technology’, an ‘adhesive’ that pulls together ‘public politics, civil society, and private domestic life’, this journey through the history of celebrity will track the rise of individualism, consumerism, the arrival of mass media and the emerging impact of digital formats and social media. The course shows that celebrity—and our preoccupation with it—reveals much about our society and even more about ourselves.

Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this course, students will have the knowledge and skills to:

  1. demonstrate an understanding of the factors shaping the cultural phenomenon of celebrity and its iterations over an extended period of history;
  2. explain the influence or impact of those factors and the areas and periods of change associated with them;
  3. assess a range of historiographical approaches to 'celebrity', and to related areas of social and political change;
  4. demonstrate  research skills in working with a diversity of historical and secondary sources; and
  5. construct an evidence-based historical argument in a form suitable to its purpose and target audience.

What is auditing?

Auditing or "listening in" offers access to some ANU undergraduate courses (lectures only).

The Centre for Continuing Education offers access to approved ANU undergraduate courses for people who want to listen in to lectures without actually enrolling as a degree student. Auditors (listeners) do not generally require any special qualifications except for those courses where prerequisites are necessary - this can be ascertained by consulting the current ANU Undergraduate Handbook.

Audit students may not sit formal examinations. An Audit enrolment guarantees admission only to lectures. Attendance at lectures will under no circumstances be accepted as credit towards a degree program. Auditors may seek permission from the faculty to attend tutorials (subject to space being available), additional fees may apply.