What is auditing?

Auditing or "listening in" offers access to some ANU undergraduate courses (lectures only).

The Centre for Continuing Education offers access to approved ANU undergraduate courses for people who want to listen in to lectures without actually enrolling as a degree student. Auditors (listeners) do not generally require any special qualifications except for those courses where prerequisites are necessary - this can be ascertained by consulting the current ANU Undergraduate Handbook.

Audit students may not sit formal examinations. An Audit enrolment guarantees admission only to lectures. Attendance at lectures will under no circumstances be accepted as credit towards a degree program. Auditors may seek permission from the faculty to attend tutorials (subject to space being available), additional fees may apply.

Mon 23 Jul 2018 - Fri 26 Oct 2018

TBA

12 Sessions
10 spots remaining.

Burmese is the official language of Myanmar and is the main lingua-franca in the country, as well as in international Burmese communities. It has over 30 million speakers worldwide. Myanmar is one of the fastest growing economies in the world and has recently begun a process of 'opening up'. Burmese has a rich literary and cultural tradition and a thriving publishing industry. Students will gain not only language skills but also a deep understanding of the rich Burmese culture and social attitudes.

For more information, please visit: http://programsandcourses.anu.edu.au/2017/course/BURM2002

Mon 23 Jul 2018 - Mon 06 Aug 2018

TBA

12 Sessions
10 spots remaining.

This course will build on the skills learned in Burmese 1. 

Learning Outcomes

On satisfying the requirements of this course, students will have the knowledge and skills at an Advanced Beginner level of Burmese to:
1. Reproduce Burmese pronunciation in Burmese script with some basic knowledge of irregular spellings.
2. Use an active vocabulary of around 700 items.
3. Recognise and produce contextually appropriate utterances in the sentence structures of colloquial Burmese relevant to frequently occurring situations in everyday life.
4. Read and produce texts written in colloquial style Burmese such as personal messages, speech scripts and some cartoons.
5. Demonstrate an understanding of cultural practices which includes social etiquettes, basic knowledge of their traditional and national events. 

What is auditing?

Auditing or "listening in" offers access to some ANU undergraduate courses (lectures only).

The Centre for Continuing Education offers access to approved ANU undergraduate courses for people who want to listen in to lectures without actually enrolling as a degree student. Auditors (listeners) do not generally require any special qualifications except for those courses where prerequisites are necessary - this can be ascertained by consulting the current ANU Undergraduate Handbook.

Audit students may not sit formal examinations. An Audit enrolment guarantees admission only to lectures. Attendance at lectures will under no circumstances be accepted as credit towards a degree program. Auditors may seek permission from the faculty to attend tutorials (subject to space being available), additional fees may apply.

No dates are currently scheduled.

* This course is available in Semester 1

This course will introduce students to the Burmese language, and provide them with communicative commands at an Introductory level, with an emphasis on conversation in everyday situations. Students will also begin to familiarise themselves with reading and writing Burmese script.

Learning Outcomes

On satisfying the requirements of this course, students will have the knowledge and skills at an Introductory level of Burmese to:

  1. 1. Recognise and pronounce the 32 Burmese consonants, seven basic vowels, and three tones, as well as other distinctive features of Burmese pronunciation such as glottal stops.
  2.  Reproduce Burmese pronunciation according to the Romanization system used by SOAS, London University, to support the basic use of English-Burmese and Burmese-English dictionaries; recognize the Burmese script and reproduce basic words in it.
  3. Use an active vocabulary of around 300 items.
  4. Recognise and produce sentence structures in colloquial Burmese to allow short conversations and the reading and writing of short, basic texts.
  5. Understand and compose basic forms of colloquial style of Burmese such as greetings and simple questions and answers about personal details, statements on the quantity and quality of things they encounter in everyday life.
  6. Demonstrate an understanding of basic cultural practices such as honorifics for Burmese names and the custom of birthdays of the week. 

What is auditing?

Auditing or "listening in" offers access to some ANU undergraduate courses (lectures only).

The Centre for Continuing Education offers access to approved ANU undergraduate courses for people who want to listen in to lectures without actually enrolling as a degree student. Auditors (listeners) do not generally require any special qualifications except for those courses where prerequisites are necessary - this can be ascertained by consulting the current ANU Undergraduate Handbook.

Audit students may not sit formal examinations. An Audit enrolment guarantees admission only to lectures. Attendance at lectures will under no circumstances be accepted as credit towards a degree program. Auditors may seek permission from the faculty to attend tutorials (subject to space being available), additional fees may apply.

No dates are currently scheduled.

* This course is available in Semester 1

This course will expand upon the competencies learned in Burmese 2. Students will develop lower intermediate spoken and written language skills in Burmese. By the end of the course, students will be able to conduct a simple conversation and find their way around in Myanmar. 

Learning Outcomes

On satisfying the requirements of this course, students will have the knowledge and skills at an Advanced Beginner level of Burmese to:

  1. Reproduce Burmese pronunciation in Burmese script, including basic words drawn from Pali.
  2. Use an active vocabulary around 1,100 items.
  3. Demonstrate knowledge of the syntax of colloquial Burmese for use in short conversations and texts on topics beyond those of daily life; demonstrate a basic knowledge of the grammar of literary Burmese and appropriate vocabulary for the style.
  4. Read and write in a more sophisticated style of colloquial Burmese on such specific or technical topics as university study and experiences in the workplace, with an awareness of formal and informal registers; read short passages written in the literary style, such as notices in public and some excerpts from Burmese school textbooks.
  5. 5. Analyse in depth the cultural and social practices of Burmese societies.

What is auditing?

Auditing or "listening in" offers access to some ANU undergraduate courses (lectures only).

The Centre for Continuing Education offers access to approved ANU undergraduate courses for people who want to listen in to lectures without actually enrolling as a degree student. Auditors (listeners) do not generally require any special qualifications except for those courses where prerequisites are necessary - this can be ascertained by consulting the current ANU Undergraduate Handbook.

Audit students may not sit formal examinations. An Audit enrolment guarantees admission only to lectures. Attendance at lectures will under no circumstances be accepted as credit towards a degree program. Auditors may seek permission from the faculty to attend tutorials (subject to space being available), additional fees may apply.