What is auditing?

Auditing or "listening in" offers access to some ANU undergraduate courses (lectures only).

The Centre for Continuing Education offers access to approved ANU undergraduate courses for people who want to listen in to lectures without actually enrolling as a degree student. Auditors (listeners) do not generally require any special qualifications except for those courses where prerequisites are necessary - this can be ascertained by consulting the current ANU Undergraduate Handbook.

Audit students may not sit formal examinations. An Audit enrolment guarantees admission only to lectures. Attendance at lectures will under no circumstances be accepted as credit towards a degree program. Auditors may seek permission from the faculty to attend tutorials (subject to space being available), additional fees may apply.

Mon 23 Jul 2018 - Fri 26 Oct 2018

TBA

12 Sessions
9 spots remaining.

This course deals with aspects of Australian art practice from the 1970s to the present. Where appropriate, examples of international art will be considered to place Australian art within context.

The course is issue and object oriented. Topics include the legacy of art practice of the 1970s, the development of postmodern approaches, the emergence of intercultural concerns, the artistic interchanges between Australia and the Asia/Pacific region, the emergence of urban Aboriginal art, and the significance of the advent of new technologies. Works of art in a range of media, including design and the decorative arts, will be considered.

Students are expected to engage critically with contemporary works of art in current exhibitions in Canberra. Visits to the National Gallery of Australia, the National Portrait Gallery, Canberra Contemporary Art Space, CraftACT, the Drill Hall Gallery and other local galleries will be essential. Lectures will comprise a mix of sources and approaches; whenever possible, artists/guest speakers will also address the group.

 

Learning Outcomes

Upon Successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate knowledge of important aspects of contemporary art in Australia
  2. Relate developments in contemporary art to contemporary visual culture
  3. Analyse and interpret works of Australian contemporary art in different media
  4. Present written and oral arguments about contemporary art in Australia.
No dates are currently scheduled.

This course will help you to become a better historian and a better analyst of historical writing.  It examines the principles, strategies and assumptions underlying different forms of history.  It also introduces current debates about the discipline.  The course will consider key developments in historical thought and method, from the classical period to the present day.  It will invite you to consider the social functions of historical writing, as well as to critically assess the methods and models employed by different schools and traditions of historical thought.  

Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

1)    Comprehend and constructively debate key philosophical and methodological issues central to the study of history and important to other disciplines in the humanities and social sciences.

2)    Critically analyse the methods which have been employed by different historians and schools of historical thought in their efforts to understand and write about the past 

3)    Detect the underlying premises and assumptions embedded in specific pieces of historical writing and/or other forms of historical media

4)    Construct sustained arguments concerning the strengths and weaknesses of different approaches to the study of the past

5)    Reflect on theoretical issues relevant to the practice of different forms of history and their implications for students’ own work

What is auditing?

Auditing or "listening in" offers access to some ANU undergraduate courses (lectures only).

The Centre for Continuing Education offers access to approved ANU undergraduate courses for people who want to listen in to lectures without actually enrolling as a degree student. Auditors (listeners) do not generally require any special qualifications except for those courses where prerequisites are necessary - this can be ascertained by consulting the current ANU Undergraduate Handbook.

Audit students may not sit formal examinations. An Audit enrolment guarantees admission only to lectures. Attendance at lectures will under no circumstances be accepted as credit towards a degree program. Auditors may seek permission from the faculty to attend tutorials (subject to space being available), additional fees may apply.  

No dates are currently scheduled.

This course offers students the chance to explore the literary, historical and cultural contexts of Ancient Greece though the close study of a text or series of texts read in the original language. Each iteration of the course is designed around a single author, genre, or theme. There will be further tuition in and revision of the grammar and syntax of Ancient Greek.

Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this course, students will have the knowledge and skills to:

  1. Read significant passages of the ancient Greek text(s) studied in class with the aid of a dictionary and a commentary.
  2. Demonstrate knowledge of specific grammatical concepts and core vocabulary relevant to the text(s).
  3. Demonstrate an understanding of the author(s)' literary style, compositional approach and/or rhetorical effects.
  4. Discuss the literary, historical and cultural contexts of the text(s) studied.

What is auditing?

Auditing or "listening in" offers access to some ANU undergraduate courses (lectures only).

The Centre for Continuing Education offers access to approved ANU undergraduate courses for people who want to listen in to lectures without actually enrolling as a degree student. Auditors (listeners) do not generally require any special qualifications except for those courses where prerequisites are necessary - this can be ascertained by consulting the current ANU Undergraduate Handbook.

Audit students may not sit formal examinations. An Audit enrolment guarantees admission only to lectures. Attendance at lectures will under no circumstances be accepted as credit towards a degree program. Auditors may seek permission from the faculty to attend tutorials (subject to space being available), additional fees may apply.