What is auditing?

Auditing or "listening in" offers access to some ANU undergraduate courses (lectures only).

The Centre for Continuing Education offers access to approved ANU undergraduate courses for people who want to listen in to lectures without actually enrolling as a degree student. Auditors (listeners) do not generally require any special qualifications except for those courses where prerequisites are necessary - this can be ascertained by consulting the current ANU Undergraduate Handbook.

Audit students may not sit formal examinations. An Audit enrolment guarantees admission only to lectures. Attendance at lectures will under no circumstances be accepted as credit towards a degree program. Auditors may seek permission from the faculty to attend tutorials (subject to space being available), additional fees may apply.

Mon 23 Jul 2018 - Fri 26 Oct 2018

TBA

12 Sessions
10 spots remaining.

This course extends from Introductory Persian A. Students will develop their skills in reading, writing and conversation and undertake translation from and into Persian at a higher introductory level. Students will develop a larger vocabulary relating to a wider range of topics, building on their studies in Introductory Persian A.


Course Instruction Method and Enrolment (Mode of Delivery) Introductory Persian B may be taken either on-campus or online. Both Modes of Delivery provide an equivalent introductory foundation in the Persian language for all four fundamental language skills and have an equivalent workload. ANU students will normally enrol in the on-campus mode of delivery but may also enrol online (subject to visa requirements);  students from other institutions around Australia or internationally may elect to enrol cross-institutionally in the online course.

Learning Outcomes

Upon Successful completion of this course, students will be able to: 

  1. Read Persian texts in simple and calligraphic styles containing frequent structural forms and patterns with confidence
  2. Speak with understandable pronunciation and initiate and maintain predictable face-to-face conversations on personal, everyday and cultural topics with a demonstrated knowledge of social courtesy demands
  3. Write independently with full control of the Persian script with minimal grammatical and syntactical error (including in the present, past and future tenses) in handwriting and/or typing on social and cultural topics
  4. Comprehend medium-length conversations and questions beyond survival needs and meet social requirements in the present, past, and future tenses as well as the imperative.

What is auditing?

Auditing or "listening in" offers access to some ANU undergraduate courses (lectures only).

The Centre for Continuing Education offers access to approved ANU undergraduate courses for people who want to listen in to lectures without actually enrolling as a degree student. Auditors (listeners) do not generally require any special qualifications except for those courses where prerequisites are necessary - this can be ascertained by consulting the current ANU Undergraduate Handbook.

Audit students may not sit formal examinations. An Audit enrolment guarantees admission only to lectures. Attendance at lectures will under no circumstances be accepted as credit towards a degree program. Auditors may seek permission from the faculty to attend tutorials (subject to space being available), additional fees may apply.

No dates are currently scheduled.

Requiring no previous knowledge of the language, Introductory Persian A instructs students in the fundamentals of the Persian Language which is the mother tongue of more than 150 million people in the Middle East and is spoken today primarily in Iran, Afghanistan, and Tajikistan. Students will quickly master the Persian script and on completion of the course be able to speak, listen, read, write, and comprehend Modern Standard Persian at a basic level across various everyday communicative subjects in both semi-formal and formal social and literary contexts. Students will acquire a basic vocabulary of the 300-400 most commonly used words as well as understand and reproduce the most important grammatical structures in Persian. Historically, Persian was widely understood from the Mediterranean to India, and Introductory Persian A students will acquire a familiarity with the rich Persian historical, literary, and cultural legacy across the great Middle East and Central Asia with a particular focus on Iran.

Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Read all characters of the Persian alphabet and simple cursive writing equivalent to usual printing or typescript containing high-frequency structural patterns and vocabulary
  2. Speak with understandable pronunciation and maintain simple, predictable face-to-face conversations, and responding to simple questions on familiar topics
  3. Write independently with sufficient control of the Persian script and basic vocabulary  with some grammatical and syntactical error (including in the present and past tense) in handwriting and/or typing
  4. Comprehend short conversations and questions beyond basic survival needs and limited social demands in areas of immediate need or on familiar topics in both the present and past tenses

What is auditing?

Auditing or "listening in" offers access to some ANU undergraduate courses (lectures only).

The Centre for Continuing Education offers access to approved ANU undergraduate courses for people who want to listen in to lectures without actually enrolling as a degree student. Auditors (listeners) do not generally require any special qualifications except for those courses where prerequisites are necessary - this can be ascertained by consulting the current ANU Undergraduate Handbook.

Audit students may not sit formal examinations. An Audit enrolment guarantees admission only to lectures. Attendance at lectures will under no circumstances be accepted as credit towards a degree program. Auditors may seek permission from the faculty to attend tutorials (subject to space being available), additional fees may apply.


No dates are currently scheduled.

This course extends on the foundation built in Introductory Persian A and B. It involves a more detailed presentation of functions of the language, oral and aural practice, and reading of texts and the writing of compositions that incorporate features of the language already presented through some important cultural issues. On completion of this subject students will have acquired upper-intermediate proficiency in Persian conversational forms, a reasonable proficiency in written structures and an ability to formulate such structures, an understanding of some of the commonly used grammatical structures of Persian and the ability to apply them in speech and writing, the ability to interpret messages of an average complexity occurring in some audio-visual media and in individual and group spoken forms, and familiarity with some of the dominant cultural ideas and forms in the Persian culture.

Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this course, students will have the knowledge and skills to:
 
1. Demonstrate sufficient reading comprehension to understand factual material in nontechnical prose as well as some discussions on concrete topics related to personal interests, social, cultural and historical matters using relevant knowledge of linguistic and cultural context.
2. Speak with understandable pronunciation and initiate and maintain predictable face-to-face conversations to satisfy regular social demands with fundamentally accurate grammar, common forms of verbs and tenses, and suitable vocabulary, including both formal and colloquial Persian.
3. Write routine social correspondence, about daily situations, current events and describe surroundings and causation with good control of morphology, punctuation and grammatical conventions.
4. Comprehend short conversations and questions about social, cultural, and historical issues with flexibility in understanding a range of circumstances beyond basic survival needs in present, future and past tenses.
 

What is auditing?

Auditing or "listening in" offers access to some ANU undergraduate courses (lectures only).

The Centre for Continuing Education offers access to approved ANU undergraduate courses for people who want to listen in to lectures without actually enrolling as a degree student. Auditors (listeners) do not generally require any special qualifications except for those courses where prerequisites are necessary - this can be ascertained by consulting the current ANU Undergraduate Handbook.

Audit students may not sit formal examinations. An Audit enrolment guarantees admission only to lectures. Attendance at lectures will under no circumstances be accepted as credit towards a degree program. Auditors may seek permission from the faculty to attend tutorials (subject to space being available), additional fees may apply.




No dates are currently scheduled.

This course builds on the Introductory and Intermediate levels of Persian language. This subject will develop the full range of linguistic skills in Persian such as the capacity to use idiomatic and conversational forms and to use them freely in speech; proficiency in written structures of moderate to advanced complexity and the capacity to use such structures clearly and accurately; interpreting messages of a medium level of complexity occurring in a variety of audio-visual media and individual and group spoken forms. Students should become conversant in some aspects of advanced Persian syntax and morphology, the historical development of Persian language and literature up to the modern period including examples of literary writing in the modern period, and translation of texts of moderate difficulty from Persian to English and English to Persian.

Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this course, students will have the knowledge and skills to:

  1. Demonstrate competency in understanding factual material on concrete and abstract topics, while using knowledge of linguistic and cultural context to understand current social and political situations.
  2. Demonstrate command of grammar, pronunciation, and intonation accurately in all social contexts with minimal difficulty to satisfy social and informational demands.
  3. Demonstrate ability to write and translate texts of moderate difficulty between Persian and English (bi-directional) with good control of correct morphology, syntactical structures, punctuation, and in a legible and stylistically correct handwriting.
  4. Comprehend and participate in conversations on personal, social, and some limited abstract and academic topics at upper-intermediate and advanced levels.

What is auditing?

Auditing or "listening in" offers access to some ANU undergraduate courses (lectures only).

The Centre for Continuing Education offers access to approved ANU undergraduate courses for people who want to listen in to lectures without actually enrolling as a degree student. Auditors (listeners) do not generally require any special qualifications except for those courses where prerequisites are necessary - this can be ascertained by consulting the current ANU Undergraduate Handbook.

Audit students may not sit formal examinations. An Audit enrolment guarantees admission only to lectures. Attendance at lectures will under no circumstances be accepted as credit towards a degree program. Auditors may seek permission from the faculty to attend tutorials (subject to space being available), additional fees may apply.

No dates are currently scheduled.

This course extends on the skillset developed in Intermediate Persian A, itself a foundation on Introductory Persian A and B. It involves a more detailed presentation of functions of the language, oral and aural practice, and reading of texts and the writing of compositions that incorporate features of the language already presented through some important cultural issues. On completion of this subject students will have acquired upper-intermediate proficiency in Persian conversational forms, a versatile proficiency in understanding written structures and an ability to formulate such structures, an understanding of some of the commonly used grammatical structures of Persian and the ability to apply them in speech and writing, the ability to interpret messages of an average complexity occurring in audio-visual media and in individual and group spoken forms, and familiarity with some of the dominant cultural ideas and forms of Persian culture and history.

Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this course, students will have the knowledge and skills to:

  1.  Demonstrate sufficient reading comprehension to understand factual material in nontechnical prose as well as most discussion on concrete and abstract topics using relevant knowledge of linguistic and cultural context, including with unfamiliar material.
  2. Speak with understandable pronunciation and initiate and maintain predictable face-to-face conversations to satisfy both regular and uncommon social demands with fundamentally correct grammar, accurate and suitable use of verbs and tenses, and suitable vocabulary, including both in formal, standard, and colloquial Persian.
  3. Write correspondence and compositions on academic topics as well as about daily situations, current events and describe surroundings and causation with good control of morphology, punctuation and grammatical conventions at an upper-intermediate level.
  4. Comprehend and engage in medium-length conversations and trade questions about personal, social, cultural, and historical issues with flexibility in understanding a range of circumstances beyond basic survival needs in all tenses.

What is auditing?

Auditing or "listening in" offers access to some ANU undergraduate courses (lectures only).

The Centre for Continuing Education offers access to approved ANU undergraduate courses for people who want to listen in to lectures without actually enrolling as a degree student. Auditors (listeners) do not generally require any special qualifications except for those courses where prerequisites are necessary - this can be ascertained by consulting the current ANU Undergraduate Handbook.

Audit students may not sit formal examinations. An Audit enrolment guarantees admission only to lectures. Attendance at lectures will under no circumstances be accepted as credit towards a degree program. Auditors may seek permission from the faculty to attend tutorials (subject to space being available), additional fees may apply

No dates are currently scheduled.

This course builds on Advanced Persian A. It will develop various skills such as the capacity to use some idiomatic and conversational forms and ability to use them freely in speech; proficiency in written structures of advanced complexity and the capacity to use such structures clearly and accurately; interpreting messages of an advanced level of complexity occurring in a variety of audio-visual media and individual and group spoken forms. Students should become conversant in some aspects of advanced Persian syntax and morphology, the historical development of Persian language and literature up to the modern period including some examples of literary writing and translation of sophisticated classical and modern poetry and prose.

Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this course, students will have the knowledge and skills to:

  1. Comprehend concrete and abstract topics presented in different mediums using knowledge of linguistic and cultural content to an advanced level.
  2. Apply grammar, pronunciation and intonation accurately in a written and spoken medium for different contexts.
  3. Write and translate texts of high difficulty between Persian and English with control of correct morphology, syntactical structures and punctuation in a legible and stylistically correct grammar.
  4. Comprehend and engage in extended-length conversations using Persian at an advanced level.

What is auditing?

  1. Auditing or "listening in" offers access to some ANU undergraduate courses (lectures only).

    The Centre for Continuing Education offers access to approved ANU undergraduate courses for people who want to listen in to lectures without actually enrolling as a degree student. Auditors (listeners) do not generally require any special qualifications except for those courses where prerequisites are necessary - this can be ascertained by consulting the current ANU Undergraduate Handbook.

    Audit students may not sit formal examinations. An Audit enrolment guarantees admission only to lectures. Attendance at lectures will under no circumstances be accepted as credit towards a degree program. Auditors may seek permission from the faculty to attend tutorials (subject to space being available), additional fees may apply