What is auditing?

Auditing or "listening in" offers access to some ANU undergraduate courses (lectures only).

The Centre for Continuing Education offers access to approved ANU undergraduate courses for people who want to listen in to lectures without actually enrolling as a degree student. Auditors (listeners) do not generally require any special qualifications except for those courses where prerequisites are necessary - this can be ascertained by consulting the current ANU Undergraduate Handbook.

Audit students may not sit formal examinations. An Audit enrolment guarantees admission only to lectures. Attendance at lectures will under no circumstances be accepted as credit towards a degree program. Auditors may seek permission from the faculty to attend tutorials (subject to space being available), additional fees may apply.

No dates are currently scheduled.

This course is a part of the new agreement that ANU has with Open Universities Australia to deliver 6 Asian language courses online. This language will now only be accessible through OUA and will not form a part of the ANU Audit program from Semester 2, 2018.

For full information, please visit: http://www.open.edu.au/subjects/anu-sanskrit-1-anu-skrt1002

No dates are currently scheduled.

Classical Sanskrit is the key to the treasure-trove of South Asian cultures, spirituality and wisdom. It is the primary language of classical Indian art, music, dance, literature and religion. It is also of interest to students of historical and comparative linguistics and provides a basis for the study of modern Indian languages. Many of our students are yoga teachers or practioners, adherents of Indian spiritual traditions, and students of South Asian heritage who wish to learn more about their cultural roots. 

ANU prides itself on teaching Sanskrit as a living tradition, in which performance and production of language are valued alongside the traditional requirements of grammar and reception. The course is flexibly delivered to students all over the world. Watch Dr McComas Taylor talk about Learning anytime, anywhere.

For further information see: http://chl.anu.edu.au/languages/sanskrit/  

For Sanskrit course enquiries email Dr McComas Taylor at McComas.Taylor@anu.edu.au

Course description

This is a high-level reading course in Sanskrit literature. The four-year Sanskrit program is designed to introduce students to the broadest possible range of literary genres, including epic, courtly poetry, drama, Upani?adic verse and Vedic. This course will introduce final-year students to the important epigrammatical genre of sutra which is characterised by extreme brevity and density of expression. Sutra texts, as a result of their terseness, are often accompanied by commentaries by indigenous authors which explain and elaborate on the root-text. Commentaries themselves also form an important genre, and mastering the conventions associated with commentarial style is an important stage in a student's development as an independent reader of Sanskrit texts.

Learning outcomes

On satisfying the requirements of this course, students will have the knowledge and skills at an Advanced level of Sanskrit to:

  1. Read extracts from an advanced-level text such as the Kamasutra or Gitagovinda fluently and accurately, and chant the verses with an appropriate meter. 
  2. Translate the vocabulary of the text in hand with an advanced level of competence in using a Sanskrit-English dictionary.
  3. Demonstrate thorough understanding of the advanced grammatical structures employed in these texts; demonstrate a high level of expertise in using reference grammars.
  4. Appreciate the linguistic registers of the root text, in contrast with other genres of Sanskrit literature, and reflect this in appropriate English translation; respond creatively to the root text in an appropriate medium.
  5. Demonstrate an advanced ability to interpret commentarial texts, showing an advanced understanding of commentarial techniques and vocabulary.
  6. Demonstrate knowledge of the social and historical context of the target texts.

What is auditing?

Auditing or "listening in" offers access to some ANU undergraduate courses (lectures only).

The Centre for Continuing Education offers access to approved ANU undergraduate courses for people who want to listen in to lectures without actually enrolling as a degree student. Auditors (listeners) do not generally require any special qualifications except for those courses where prerequisites are necessary - this can be ascertained by consulting the current ANU Undergraduate Handbook.

Audit students may not sit formal examinations. An Audit enrolment guarantees admission only to lectures. Attendance at lectures will under no circumstances be accepted as credit towards a degree program. Auditors may seek permission from the faculty to attend tutorials (subject to space being available), additional fees may apply.

No dates are currently scheduled.

This course is a part of the new agreement that ANU has with Open Universities Australia to deliver 6 Asian language courses online. This language will now only be accessible through OUA and will not form a part of the ANU Audit program from Semester 2, 2018.

For full information, please visit: http://www.open.edu.au/subjects/anu-sanskrit-2-anu-skrt1003

No dates are currently scheduled.

Classical Sanskrit is the key to the treasure-trove of South Asian cultures, spirituality and wisdom. It is the primary language of classical Indian art, music, dance, literature and religion. It is also of interest to students of historical and comparative linguistics and provides a basis for the study of modern Indian languages. Many of our students are yoga teachers or practitioners, adherents of Indian spiritual traditions, and students of South Asian heritage who wish to learn more about their cultural roots.

For further information, please visit: https://programsandcourses.anu.edu.au/2017/course/SKRT2106

No dates are currently scheduled.

Classical Sanskrit is the key to the treasure-trove of South Asian cultures, spirituality and wisdom. It is the primary language of classical Indian art, music, dance, literature and religion. It is also of interest to students of historical and comparative linguistics and provides a basis for the study of modern Indian languages. Many of our students are yoga teachers or practioners, adherents of Indian spiritual traditions, and students of South Asian heritage who wish to learn more about their cultural roots. 

ANU prides itself on teaching Sanskrit as a living tradition, in which performance and production of language are valued alongside the traditional requirements of grammar and reception. The course is flexibly delivered to students all over the world. Watch Dr McComas Taylor talk about Learning anytime, anywhere.

For further information see: http://chl.anu.edu.au/languages/sanskrit/  

For Sanskrit course enquiries email Dr McComas Taylor at McComas.Taylor@anu.edu.au

Course description

Study of Sanskrit grammar and reading of selections from Sanskrit Literature.

Learning Outcomes

On satisfying the requirements of this course, students will have the knowledge and skills at an Advanced Beginner level of Sanskrit to:

  1. Read simple epic texts smoothly and accurately and chant texts in sloka meter.
  2. Translate the vocabulary of the text in hand through the basic use of a Sanskrit-English dictionary.
  3. Recognise the range of grammatical structures in standard epic Sanskrit texts, and demonstrate a working facility in using the reference grammatical text.
  4. Appraise the linguistic registers of the root text, in contrast with other genres of Sanskrit literature, and reflect this in appropriate English translation.
  5.  Demonstrate knowledge of the social and historical contexts of epic Sanskrit texts.

What is auditing?

Auditing or "listening in" offers access to some ANU undergraduate courses (lectures only).

The Centre for Continuing Education offers access to approved ANU undergraduate courses for people who want to listen in to lectures without actually enrolling as a degree student. Auditors (listeners) do not generally require any special qualifications except for those courses where prerequisites are necessary - this can be ascertained by consulting the current ANU Undergraduate Handbook.

Audit students may not sit formal examinations. An Audit enrolment guarantees admission only to lectures. Attendance at lectures will under no circumstances be accepted as credit towards a degree program. Auditors may seek permission from the faculty to attend tutorials (subject to space being available), additional fees may apply.

No dates are currently scheduled.

Classical Sanskrit is the key to the treasure-trove of South Asian cultures, spirituality and wisdom. It is the primary language of classical Indian art, music, dance, literature and religion. It is also of interest to students of historical and comparative linguistics and provides a basis for the study of modern Indian languages. Many of our students are yoga teachers or practioners, adherents of Indian spiritual traditions, and students of South Asian heritage who wish to learn more about their cultural roots. 

ANU prides itself on teaching Sanskrit as a living tradition, in which performance and production of language are valued alongside the traditional requirements of grammar and reception. The course is flexibly delivered to students all over the world. Watch Dr McComas Taylor talk about Learning anytime, anywhere.

For further information see: http://chl.anu.edu.au/languages/sanskrit/  

For Sanskrit course enquiries email Dr McComas Taylor at McComas.Taylor@anu.edu.au

Course Description

The four-year Sanskrit program is designed to introduce students to the broadest possible range of literary genres, including epic, courtly poetry, drama, Upaniadic verse and Vedic. In this course, students will engage with a selection of readings from the Bhagavad Gita or a Purana or a similar text.

Learning Outcomes

On satisfying the requirements of this course, students will have the knowledge and skills at an Intermediate level of Sanskrit to:

  1. Read extracts from Sanskrit dramas smoothly and accurately.
  2. Translate the vocabulary of the text in hand with a high level of competence in the use of a Sanskrit-English dictionary.
  3. Demonstrate thorough understanding of the advanced grammatical structures employed in Sanskrit dramas, and demonstrate expertise in using reference grammars.
  4. Appraise the linguistic registers of the root text, in contrast with other genres of Sanskrit literature, and reflect this in appropriate English translation; respond creatively to the root text in an appropriate medium.
  5. Demonstrate an ability to interpret commentarial texts, showing an understanding of commentarial techniques and vocabulary.
  6. Demonstrate knowledge of the social and historical contexts of Sanskrit dramas.

What is auditing?

Auditing or "listening in" offers access to some ANU undergraduate courses (lectures only).

The Centre for Continuing Education offers access to approved ANU undergraduate courses for people who want to listen in to lectures without actually enrolling as a degree student. Auditors (listeners) do not generally require any special qualifications except for those courses where prerequisites are necessary - this can be ascertained by consulting the current ANU Undergraduate Handbook.

Audit students may not sit formal examinations. An Audit enrolment guarantees admission only to lectures. Attendance at lectures will under no circumstances be accepted as credit towards a degree program. Auditors may seek permission from the faculty to attend tutorials (subject to space being available), additional fees may apply.