The continuing education program offers special interest and educational courses with a difference focusing on art, archaeology, culture, history, science, literature and writing, music and life skills.

Thu 02 May 2019 - Thu 30 May 2019

18:00 - 20:00

5 Sessions
15 spots remaining.

Teacher: Gordana Platisa

Fall in love with Shakespeare! Let us ponder into the wonders of Bard’s words. While looking at selected plays, we will delve into the depths of crucial dilemmas, doubts and agonies of the age. Explore the fragility of heaven and certainty of hell in Elizabethan times, and be moved by the power of forgiveness.

Course outline

  • Topic 1: To Kill a King: Hell’s whisperings or a just cause. (Hamlet, Macbeth, Julius Caesar, Richard III).
  • Topic 2: Cakes and Ale: the roads to salvation. (Morality of a mortal coil. Twelfth Night, Henry IV).
  • Topic 3: Poison in your ear: (Hamlet and Othello in conversation).
  • Topic 4: To Tame a Woman: Hell of a Romance. (The Taming of the Shrew, Much Ado About Nothing).
  • Topic 5: Lost and Found: The slings and arrows of outrageous fortune. (Twelfth Night, The Tempest and The Winter’s Tale).

Learning outcomes

By the end of the course, you should learn more about Elizabethan views of heaven and hell, of fall and redemption. The course includes insights into plague and puritans and their role in the death of theatre. You will also find out why romantic love does not stand a chance in hell.

Who should enrol

Anyone with an interest in re-discovering and loving Shakespeare, anyone with a passion for decoding the Bard in the theatre context.

Sat 27 Apr 2019 - Sat 27 Apr 2019

09:00 - 13:30

1 Session
21 spots remaining.

Who were the Aztecs? Did the Mayans ‘disappear’ in the 10th Century?

In an attempt to answer these questions, this course will briefly examine the rise of civilisation in Central America from the Formative Period (represented by the Olmecs and early Maya) through to the cultural groups that were dominant when the Spanish arrived in the 15th and 16th Centuries – the Aztec and Maya. Examine the development of their architecture and agricultural practices along with a comparison of their art and religion.

Sat 04 May 2019 - Sat 04 May 2019

09:00 - 13:30

1 Session
21 spots remaining.

Most people have heard of the Inka but few realise that this cultural group only existed for a few centuries prior to the arrival of the Spanish in the early 16th Century. The Inka began by building on the developments of a number cultural groups whose origins reach back a further 1,000 years or more. This short course will introduce some of these groups and discuss their origins and achievements and include, among others, the Moche, Nazca, Paracas, Tiwanaku, Wari and Chimu.

Wed 01 May 2019 - Wed 19 Jun 2019

18:00 - 20:00

8 Sessions
15 spots remaining.

The Crusades are among the most important events in world history. As well as discussing themes of religion, society, warfare, and culture; meet outstanding historical individuals such as Richard the Lionheart, Saladin, Peter the Hermit, and Baldwin the leper king of Jerusalem.

Course outline

  • Topic 1: An introduction to and overview of the Crusades.
  • Topic 2: The first Crusade.
  • Topic 3: The Holy Land and the crusader states. Crusading memoirs and primary sources.
  • Topic 4: The third Crusade: Richard and Saladin.
  • Topic 5: The fourth Crusade: the sack of Constantinople.
  • Topic 6: Crusading in the Thirteenth Century: Saint Louis and the emperor Frederick II.
  • Topic 7: The Knights Templar and the military orders.
  • Topic 8: The Crusades in literature and in the western consciousness: Walter Scott's the Talisman. The Crusades and popular culture: Ridley Scott's Kingdom of Heaven.

Learning outcomes

At the end of this course, you should:

  • have a greater appreciation of historical and cultural differences, and of human nature
  • have an increased understanding of the complex relationship between the past and the present
  • have a greater awareness of how we moderns see ourselves in relation to the past.

Who should enrol

This course is open to anyone with an interest in history.

No dates are currently scheduled.

Explore and sample the best and worst of historical food, from Ancient Rome to the twentieth century. Learn about famous chefs and their recipes. Discover the joy of medieval pastries and thing you really should not know about early margarine.

Course outline

  • Topic 1: Introduction to food history and exploring basic concepts
  • Topic 2: Overeating in Ancient Rome - Apicius and his cookbook
  • Topic 3: When gluttony was a deadly sin - medieval and renaissance gourmet delights
  • Topic 4: The British empire's belly - home cooking in England in the eighteenth century
  • Topic 5: Royal recipes
  • Topic 6: The rise of the modern cookbook - Mrs Beeton and friends
  • Topic 7: The Age(s) of exploration - new food, new taste buds and new national cuisine
  • Topic 8: American frontier and colonial cooking

Depending on class interest and time, we may explore other places, times and food.

Learning outcomes

At the end of the course, students should have:

  • an understanding of food history, research of food history, and its relation with other types of history
  • knowledge of ingredients and recipes and culinary interests in Western history
  • an understanding of the links between food and trade and politics.

Who should enrol

Recommended for anyone with an interest in food and history. Previous knowledge of historical events will enrich your understanding of the subject matter but is not necessary.


No dates are currently scheduled.

Teacher: Beatrice Bodart-Bailey

As an island nation, Japan’s culture is fascinatingly different from its Asian neighbours. During two and a half centuries of self-imposed isolation in the pre-modern period, Japan developed cultural traditions so strong that they still intrigue the foreign visitor today.

Using an abundance of visual material, this course will survey Japanese history and culture from its beginnings to the early 20th century, giving due consideration to how its geographical position next to the Asian Continent and some hundred active volcanoes dotting the islands, frequent earthquakes, tsunamis, heavy monsoon rains and typhoons shaped the ethos and life-style of its people.

Course outline

  1. Introduction: the geographic and climatic features shaping Japanese history and culture. .Where did the first people on the island chain come from? Jômon culture with its fantastic pottery and masked statues.
  2. A new wave of immigrants: rice cultivation, mega tombs, mirrors, swords and a female ruler. The religion of Shinto and the sanctuary of the sun goddess Amaterasu, the progenitor of the imperial line.
  3. The introduction of Buddhism in the 6th century, the architecture of its temples that withstood earthquakes for well over a thousand years, the imagery of Buddhist statues.
  4. The founding of the imperial capital of Kyoto. The refined culture of the aristocracy. The rise of the samurai: recruited to serve the emperor, they usurped his political authority and created their own warrior culture. The attempted invasion of Kublai Khan and the divine winds that saved the country.
  5. The Christian Century: from missionary success to persecution and martyrdom. Artistic and cultural gains from the encounter between East and West. The three great unifiers of Japan and the politics of the tea ceremony.
  6. The Tokugawa military rulers (shogun) and 250 years of peace and closure of the country.  The much-maligned “Dog Shogun” and the eye-witness account of a foreign visitor.
  7. The growth of the mega city of Edo (Tokyo), and the flowering of what is celebrated as traditional Japanese culture today, such as haiku, kabuki, the art of the geisha and the woodblock print. The passion for travel: the Japanese inns and the cultural life on the busy highways.
  8. Earthquakes, tsunamis and volcanic eruptions in the18th and 19th century, the arrival of the Americans, the restoration of imperial rule and rapid Westernization.

     Learning outcomes

     Upon completion of this course, you should:

    • appreciate how the environment has shaped the culture and history of Japan
    • understand to what extent China, Korea and the West impacted on the culture and history of Japan
    • be aware how frequent natural disasters shaped religious believes and philosophical tenets in Japan, differing from those of other countries
    • know the difference between Buddhism and Shinto and the political role played by these two religions
    • have some appreciation of the role of Christianity in Japan
    • know about the origins of samurai culture and the role it played over the course of Japanese history
    • be aware of how the position of Japanese women changed over the course of Japanese history
    • understand how even after the so-called closure of Japan, cultural exchange led to advances in science and the arts in Japan and the West
    • appreciate how under the infamous Dog Shogun, laws were promulgated some of which appeared in the West only 200 years later
    • have learned about the life in perhaps the largest and most densely populated city in the world, twice the size of London in the pre-modern period.

    Who Should Enrol

    Anyone desiring to understand and appreciate the history and culture of Japan.