The continuing education program offers special interest and educational courses with a difference focusing on art, archaeology, culture, history, science, literature and writing, music and life skills.

Tue 08 May 2018 - Tue 26 Jun 2018

18:00 - 20:00

8 Sessions
30 spots remaining.

What art should I buy (or sell), and how should I go about it? Why aren’t prices shown in commercial galleries? Can I trust art auctions? Is the art made by obscenely wealthy artists better than that made by those in poverty? This course both plumbs the depths of the market’s hold on art, and enables the eager student to know good art when he or she sees it.

Course outline 

  • Topic 1: Artists’ solid gold garrets
  • Topic 2: Money, wealth and poverty in art
  • Topic 3: Dealers and collectors
  • Topic 4: Auction houses
  • Topic 5: Biennials, art fairs, art prizes, the internet
  • Topic 6: Museum councils, curators, voluntary guides
  • Topic 7: The new rich and private art museums
  • Topic 8: Price rigging, money laundering, tax evasion, fakes

Full notes will be provided during the course.

Learning outcomes

By the end of the course, you should have an understanding of artists, dealers and buying/selling art.

Who should enrol

Anyone with a passion to learn more about art.

Tue 06 Feb 2018 - Tue 27 Mar 2018

18:00 - 20:00

8 Sessions
26 spots remaining.

Marcel Proust you have all read (ha ha), but have you seen all the art works in his Remembrance of Things Past (aka In Search of Lost Time)? This richly-illustrated course gives you that privilege, and the same for Edmund de Waal’s The Hare with Amber Eyes; Steve Martin’s An Object of Beauty; Frederic Spotts’ Hitler and the Power of Aesthetics; Helen Verity Hewitt’s Patrick White, Painter Manqué; Drusilla Modjeska’s Stravinsky’s Lunch; Peter Robb’s Street Fight in Naples; and Maggie Nelson’s The Art of Cruelty.

Course outline

  • Topic 1:  Marcel Proust, Remembrance of Things Past, or In Search of Lost Time (À la recherche du temps perdu), 1913–27
  • Topic 2:  Edmund de Waal, The Hare with Amber Eyes, 2011
  • Topic 3:  Steve Martin, An Object of Beauty, 2010
  • Topic 4:  Frederic Spotts, Hitler and the Power of Aesthetics, 2002
  • Topic 5:  Helen Verity Hewitt, Patrick White, Painter Manqué, 2002
  • Topic 6:  Drusilla Modjeska, Stravinsky’s Lunch, 1999
  • Topic 7:  Peter Robb, Street Fight in Naples, 2010
  • Topic 8:  Maggie Nelson, The Art of Cruelty, 2011

Who should enrol

Anyone with a passion to learn more about art.

Tue 24 Jul 2018 - Tue 11 Sep 2018

18:00 - 20:00

8 Sessions
30 spots remaining.

Discuss favourite movies and discover related works of art, or name favourite paintings and learn about associated movies. This unique and innovative course unites the world’s ‘museum’ of art that developed in the 20th century with that century’s greatest contribution to our visual culture – the moving image.

Course outline

  • Topic 1: Movies: Rublev to Goya
  • Topic 2: Movies: Utamaro to Picasso
  • Topic 3: Movies: Modigliani to Daniel Johnston
  • Topic 4: Movies about fictional artists
  • Topic 6: Art’s effect on cinema
  • Topic 7: Cinema’s effect on art
  • Topic 8: Artists’ films & video art

Who should enrol

Anyone with a passion to learn more about art.

Tue 09 Oct 2018 - Tue 27 Nov 2018

18:00 - 20:00

8 Sessions
30 spots remaining.

Our love of music can be immensely enhanced by discovering how music has developed hand-in-hand with the visual arts. Our love of art can be similarly enriched by a pursuing the theme of music in mainly Western art to the present day.

Course outline

  • Topic 1: Music about art
  • Topic 2: Chinese, Greek and Medieval art about music
  • Topic 3: Renaissance art about music
  • Topic 4: Baroque and Romantic art about music
  • Topic 5: Modern art about music
  • Topic 6: Musicians as art
  • Topic 7: Twin talents: artists-musicians
  • Topic 8: Synaesthesia

 Who should enrol

Anyone with a passion to learn about art.
No dates are currently scheduled.

Step back in time and (re)discover the music of the 60s and 70s - exploring how technology and globalisation influenced pop-culture and the music of the day.

Course outline

  • Topic 1: Introduction and overview to the influence of technology, globalisation and the effect on popular music
  • Topic 2: 1960's
  • Topic 3: 1970's
  • Topic 4: Influential Artists
  • Topic 5: Review and Wrap-up

Learning outcomes

By the end of this course, you should have a greater appreciation of the music of the period, and its influence on modern culture.

Who should enrol

This course is open to anyone with an interest in music.

No dates are currently scheduled.

Examine the history of classical music though the centuries. Learn what makes this music (and the people who write and perform it) tick; what 'classical music' has looked and sounded like over the years; and what the future of this tradition might be. No prior knowledge necessary.

Course outline

Travel through time visiting some of your favourite composers, and some of their less well-known colleagues.

  • Topic 1: Medieval and Renaissance (500-1600)
  • Topic 2: Baroque (1600-1750)
  • Topic 3: Classical (1750-1800)
  • Topic 4: Romantic (1800-1900)
  • Topic 5: Early Modern Music (1900-1950)
  • Topic 6: Late Modernism and Postmodernism (1950-today)

Learning outcomes

By the end of the course, you should have:

  • a greater understanding of the cultural and political events which have shaped the classical music canon
  • a greater understanding of the lives and works of some of our favourite composers (and some of their less-well known colleagues)
  • more tools to direct your listening and appreciation of a wide range of periods and styles of classical music. 

Who should enrol

Anyone who is interested in learning more about how Western Art Music works (aesthetically and socially), and how it developed into what we now generically call ‘classical music’.  No previous experience needed.

No dates are currently scheduled.

Rediscover some of your favourite films and learn how their soundtracks work. Why is the Star Wars soundtrack so catchy? How do film composers do what they do? How does a soundtrack make or break a scene? No prior music knowledge necessary.

Course outline

Using some of our favourite films, explore how music can make or break a scene, while gaining some insight into how the whole process works.
  • Topic 1:  Introduction and a history of early film music
  • Topic 2: Musicals
  • Topic 3: Romantic comedies
  • Topic 4:  Action movies
  • Topic 5: Suspense/Horror
  • Topic 6: Independent films

Learning outcomes

By the end of the course, you should have an understanding of:
  • the techniques and terms used in analysing film and film soundtracks
  • how music and images interact in a wide range of movie genres
  • how composers and directors work together to create film soundtracks.

Who should enrol

This course is open to anyone with an interest in learning more about how music and film work together. No previous experience needed.