Wed 24 Nov 2021 - Thu 25 Nov 2021

9:00 - 17:00

1 Session

Face-to-face

Rachel England

24-25 November 2021, 9am - 5pm AEST

Delivery: In-person (Canberra, ACT).
Note that if in-person delivery is not practicable under COVID-19 government health requirements, the course will be delivered online 22-26 November 2021 at scheduled times (resulting in the same overall time commitment).

How to Apply: To express your interest in participating in this course, click the ‘Apply Now’ button and complete the short questionnaire. All applications will be reviewed for suitability, and applicants will be informed of the outcome of this review by email.

Course Conveners: Victoria Wheeler (Assistant Director, Climate and Development Integration Unit). Email Victoria.Wheeler@dfat.gov.au or
climate.integration@dfat.gov.au

Rachel England (ANU Course Convener). Email Rachel.England@anu.edu.au

Climate change is the most significant environmental, social and economic challenge of our time. Across the Indo-Pacific region, communities are increasingly challenged by the diverse and multiple physical impacts of climate change, such as rising sea levels, increasing frequency and intensity of cyclones, droughts, floods and storm surges, ambient heat waves, warming sea temperatures, and ocean acidification, and the resultant impacts on community cohesion and wellbeing. Climate change is also exacerbating many existing problems in the region, such as loss of biodiversity, pollution, regional peace and security, chronic poverty, gender and social inequality, humanitarian responses to natural hazards and pandemics, and inadequate essential services such as health care, education, infrastructure, social protection, and food and water security.

Committed to the United Nations’ 2015-2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and the Paris Agreement, Australia is increasing its work to support its neighbours in the Indo-Pacific tackle these climate change challenges. Innovative and decisive action is needed across the Indo-Pacific to minimise the risks of climate change on people and places, to keep the Paris goal of limiting warming to 1.5°C within reach, and to shift to a sustainable, low‑carbon, net zero future. Australia, with decades of experience supporting countries and territories of this region to strengthen their health, social, environmental and economic security and stability, is in a strong position to continue supporting partner countries to mitigate and adapt to climate change, and build community resilience.

Two Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade (DFAT) policies outline Australia’s approach to tackling climate change abroad through Australia’s development assistance program – they are, Partnerships for Recovery: Australia’s COVID-19 Development Response (2020) and Climate Change Action Strategy 2020-2025. In line with these policies, DFAT seeks to integrate climate change adaptation thinking across the Department. DFAT’s Climate Action Strategy sets three climate objectives to make the best use of our development assistance:

  • promote the shift to lower-emissions development in the Indo-Pacific region
  • support partner countries to adapt to climate change, and to plan, prepare for and respond to climate related impacts
  • support innovative solutions to climate change, including those that engage private sector investment.

In support of these objectives, this two-day short course is focused on climate change adaptation and integration opportunities in development across the Indo-Pacific.

Participating in this Course

We encourage DFAT and other government officials responsible for managing or delivering international climate initiatives in developing countries, with or alongside development assistance, to apply.

As a participant of this course, you will be presented with a series of lectures to expand your understanding of the climate change adaptation challenges of the Indo-Pacific (notably Pacific Island countries, Southeast Asia and South Asia) within a development context. The lecturers are selected academic and industry professionals from the Australian National University and elsewhere, who specialise in climate change adaptation and policy integration.

As a participant, you will also be facilitated through a variety of activities that are designed to explore a range of critical climate change considerations for Australia’s development program across different sectors and clusters. These include climate economics, food security, agriculture, tourism and governance, human security, health, water and sanitation, infrastructure, urban planning, gender equality and social inclusion. Through peer-to-peer learning and group-based discussions, you will share your experiences of working within Australia’s development program, and form a network of colleagues to support your ongoing efforts in integrating climate change adaptation thinking into your everyday work.

All participants will be asked to complete a Pre-Course Survey and a Post-Course Survey as part of this course. Confidentiality, privacy and consent information is specified on each survey form.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this course, it is expected that a fully engaged participant will have the following learning outcomes:

  • Skills to integrate climate change considerations across the aid management cycle.
  • A broad understanding of current and future climate change impacts in the Indo-Pacific regions (primarily Southeast Asia, South Asia, and Pacific Island Countries and Territories).
  • Knowledge of a suite of social and natural science-based climate change adaptation and mitigation opportunities in these regions for a development context.
  • A clear picture of the climate policy framework (domestic and international) that Australia’s development program operates within.

Learning Modules

The course is structured by eight learning modules and three interactive activities. Each module and activity is designed around particular sectors or clusters (see below) and embedded with cross-cutting themes, such as environmental sustainability, low-regrets adaptation options, nature-based solutions, social inclusion, governance, regulation/law enforcement, and breakthrough technologies.

Critical research, evaluation, interpretation and analysis skills are a focus of this course, as well an understanding of socio-economic impact models and skills to improve climate change adaptation-relevant regulatory oversight, policy intervention and service delivery.

Table 1. Themes of the modules to be delivered across the course.


* Modules are enhanced by Activities, Interactive Sessions, and Q&A sessions (not listed here). Module titles may change before the course begins to align with lecturer expertise and lecture content.

Workloads and Certificate

The course will either be delivered in-person as a two-day learning intensive in Canberra (preferred option), or online as a five-day less-intense course (if required by COVID-19 government health requirements). Participants will be required to watch a selection of videos from the DFAT online Climate Change, Energy and Environment Toolkit before commencing the course. Each learning module and interactive session spans 1-2 hours. As a guide, it is anticipated that each module will follow a format similar to:

  • 30-45 minute lecture (or multiple mini-lectures in this timespan),
  • 15-30 minute group discussion with the Lecturer, and/or
  • 20-40 minute facilitated interactive session (applied learning, case studies).

Upon satisfactory completion of this course, participants will receive an ANU Certificate of Participation.

We look forward to seeing you in the course!

Tue 02 Nov 2021 - Thu 02 Dec 2021

13:30 - 17:00

10 Sessions

Online

Michael Vardon

This course has been run annually since 2013 as a face-to-face professional development course. Last year the course was re-worked and done online and it will be done this way again in 2021.

Environmental and ecosystem accounting is increasingly being used to support the development and analysis of government policy and business decision making. Environmental accounting shows how different sectors of the economy affect the environment and vice versa. As the understanding of environment-economy interactions increases, the appropriate policy and business responses should become clearer. This professional development short course is designed to support those in government, business or NGOs interested in developing, implementing or using environmental or ecosystem accounts.

The course is to be held over five weeks, on two afternoons per week, with two sessions per afternoon. Each session is 1.5 hours and will be a mix of presentation and activities. The course draws on expertise from the Australian Bureau of Statistics, the Australian National University and other institutions. It covers the theoretical and practical fundamentals of environmental and ecosystem accounting and places this into the public policy framework and other decision-making processes. Examples are drawn from around the world, and information resources are discussed and explored in practical workshops. Participants will have the opportunity to share experiences and are invited to use their own data for shaping into accounts.

Requisite Knowledge

No specific prior knowledge is assumed but it is expected that participants have worked professionally in disciplines related to environmental or ecosystem accounting, including environmental science, ecological economics, natural resource management, national accounting or statistics.

Teaching Staff

  • Michael Vardon, Fenner School of Environment and Society
  • Peter Burnett, ANU Law School
  • Steve May, Australian Bureau of Statistics
  • Carl Obst, Institute for Development of Environmental-Economic Accounting. Former head of ABS national accounts. SEEA Editor.

There will also be a range of guest lectures. 

Learning outcomes

On successfully completing of the course participants will be able to:

  • explain the key features of environmental and ecosystem accounting
  • understand the range of information sources needed to compile accounts
  • identify issues to which environmental or ecosystem accounts could be applied
  • populate basic accounting tables with existing information
  • know where to find help and additional information on the concepts, data sources and methods.

In addition to knowledge of the accounts and their uses, course participants will develop the skills needed to manage a team with diverse knowledge and experience that is needed to produce and use environmental accounts.

Assessment

All learning outcomes are addressed by each assessment task. Assessment takes four forms:

  • on-going assessment of class activities
  • report on virtual field exercise
  • 90-minute written test
  • group assignment - short presentation and briefing note.

Workloads

  • In-person contact - 30 hours
  • Private study - 8 hours
  • Assessment - 4 hours.

Is the course for credit at ANU?

Completion of this professional short course does not provide ANU course credit or an ANU transcript.

No dates are currently scheduled.


ANU  has developed an Energy short course designed to provide an opportunity for mid-career policy and technology professionals from partner Indo-Pacific countries and regional level bodies to undertake an intensive university level course on the energy transition, with a specific focus on grid integration of renewable energy. Participants will gain applied technical and policy experience and create high-value professional contacts and linkages within the energy sector. 

This short course will ensure that energy transition knowledge and skills are transferred to participants in a way that supports and extends Australia’s international climate change activities and complements Australia’s development assistance program.

The course will be a mix of formal and applied learning, including the development of an Implementation proposal that outlines how the knowledge gained might be applied in the participant’s particular national or institutional context. 

Closing date for applications: 11:59pm, 18 August 2021 (AEST)

Workloads

The Energy course will comprise two 2-hour sessions per week for 6 weeks i.e. a total of 12 sessions. Sessions will be held on Tuesdays and Thursdays, 11am - 1pm (Australian Eastern Standard Time) starting 7 September and concluding 14 October 2021.

The delivery will be via teleconference and contact with the class will be via email and an educational interface.

Each session will include:

  • Pre-reading
  • Questions on notice
  • Lectures
  • Discussion session/ Q&A
  • Feedback form

Contact with the participants will begin prior to the first session to provide pre-reading materials, answer questions, and potentially undertake a quiz to determine prior knowledge. 

Course outline

Over the six weeks the program will be highly interactive with a mix of lectures, practical exercises, workshops and discussions groups delivered via twelve sessions. The course topics are presented below.

Week 1

Session 1

The Australian experience in the global context

  • Global energy trends
  • Australia's renewable energy transition

Session 2

Renewable generation

  • Solar (PV and thermal)
  • Wind
  • Hydro, geothermal and other renewables
  • Generation comparisons 

Week 2

Session 3

Energy storage and recovery

  • Batteries
  • Pumped hydro
  • Hydrogen

Session 4

Operation of electricity grids

  • Australian National Electricity Market
  • System-wide planning
  • Electrification of other energy use

Week 3

Session 5

Electricity market mechanisms and energy economics

  • Energy only markets
  • Capacity markets
  • Day ahead markets
  • FCAS markets
  • Other market mechanisms

Session 6

Renewable Energy Policy frameworks

  • Renewable Energy Target
  • Reverse auctions
  • Contracts for difference
  • Feed in tariffs
  • Public grants and equity investments
  • Case study - ACT government 2045 zero-carbon plan

Week 4

Session 7

Micro-grids opportunities and challenges

  • Integration of renewables
  • Integration of storage
  • Smart inverters
  • Barriers

Session 8

Industry workforce planning and transitions

  • The geography of energy employment
  • Transitioning the fossil fuel generation workforce
  • Expanding the renewable energy workforce

Week 5

Session 9

The social transition

  • Social behaviour and change
  • Indigenous participation

Session 10

International renewable energy systems

  • Electricity super-grids
  • Barriers to regional electricity trade
  • Hydrogen/ammonia

Week 6

Session 11

Trade, investment and Green Industrial Policy

  • Green Industrial Policy
  • Commodity-level emissions accounting and certification to support trade
  • Trade and investment policy linkages

Session 12

Concluding session, potentially including:

  • Participant presentations
  • Lecturer panel discussion
  • Closing ceremony and graduation 

Requisite Knowledge

To participate in this course, it is expected that participants have worked professionally in disciplines that deal with climate change , energy and policy making.

Learning outcomes

On completion of this short course, participants will have developed a deeper understanding of the energy transition.  They will also acquire knowledge of how both technology and policy can shape the integration of renewable energy into the grid, enabling economy-wide decarbonisation through the electrification of all energy uses. 

By the end of this course, Participants in the Energy course will:

  • Understand the key technologies that will enable the transition to a zero-emissions energy system
  • Engage with the key technological issues that underpin the integration of renewable energy into the grid
  • Consider the market, regulatory and policy frameworks that underpin the operation and facilitate the transition of the energy sector
  • Consider the socio-economic issues that will need to be addressed in the energy transition
  • Understand the barriers, challenges and opportunities presented by international renewable energy trade.

Who should enrol

ANU is committed to promoting and supporting gender equality, diversity and inclusiveness. We encourage mid-career professionals working in Government, NGOs or private business on issues related to or interest in climate change adaptation, mitigation and/or disaster recovery from the following eligible countries.

Please Note: Seeking applications from the following countries

  • Cook Islands
  • French Polynesia
  • Kiribati
  • Mariana Islands
  • Micronesia
  • New Caledonia
  • Tokelau 
  • Tonga

In addition, to complete your application you will need the following documents:

  • Current CV
  • Evidence of an International English Language Testing System (IELTS) score of 6.5 or above, OR
  • Evidence of (certificate) a Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) score of 80 and above
  • Letter of recommendation from Employer
No dates are currently scheduled.

The LSO-Advanced training course provides comprehensive training on the use of lasers as well as the design safe working environments in an enclosed laboratory or in an open field setting. The course will be taught via in-person learning and includes practical laboratory work involving high-power lasers.

The LSO-Advanced training equips the student with the understanding to evaluate and mitigate laser hazards as well as the ability to assume responsibility to administer/oversee laboratories and open-field conditions where lasers are used. Since the course is an extension of the LSO-Intermediate training, students in this course would have already obtained basic understanding of laser principles and their interaction with biological tissues i.e. skin and eyes. Moreover, the LSO-Advanced training equips the student with the competency to "quantitatively" evaluate laser hazards. The course also includes practical training on the safe use of lasers in an enclosed or open field setting as well as measurement of laser parameters for accurate classification of lasers.The course will then assess laser exposure and the concept of hazard distance.

The course is ideally catered for researchers as well as laboratory managers of research laboratories where lasers are extensively used. Researchers who intend to use lasers in an open field setting are required to undertake the course.

Coverage

  • LSO-Intermediate coverage and -
  • In-depth knowledge of laser principles and light-tissue interactions
  • Actual experience of lasers of all classifications
  • Quantitative assessment of laser safety hazard risks and mitigation (Theory and Experiment)
  • Classification of all types of lasers (Theory and Experiment)
  • Theoretical and practical examination

Learning outcomes

  • Distinguish lasers from other light sources
  • Identify the atomic or molecular processes involved in producing a laser beam
  • Categorise the interactions between lasers and biological tissue/eyes
  • Identify and mitigate risks and hazards on the use of lasers.
  • Articulate and explain the laser safety terminologies specified in the Aus/NZ Laser Safety Standards (AS/NZS IEC 60825.1:2014.)
  • Identify engineering and administrative controls on the design of safe working environment for lasers
  • Prescribe suitable personal protective equipment on the safe use of lasers.
  • Quantitatively evaluate the safety conditions pertaining to Maximum Permissible Exposure (MPE) and Nominal Ocular/Skin Hazard Distance (NOHD/NSHD) by navigating the AS/NZS IEC 60825.1:2014
  • Classify lasers by experimentally measuring the parameters defining the Accessible Emission Limits (AEL) as provided by the AS/NZS IEC 60825.1:2014
  • Demonstrate the ability to design and construct laser safety working environments in a closed and open-field setting
No dates are currently scheduled.

The LSO-Intermediate training equips the student with the understanding to evaluate and mitigate laser hazards as well as the ability to assume responsibility to manage laser laboratories. This course will be taught via in-person or on-line learning and provides the student with the basic understanding of laser principles and their interaction with biological tissues i.e. skin and eyes. The course will orient the student on how to identify and mitigate risks and hazards on the use of lasers as well as prescribe suitable personal protective equipment. The course is ideally catered for researchers as well as laboratory managers of research laboratories where lasers are used.

Coverage

  • Basic principles of lasers
  • Laser Hazards - Understand the basic interaction of lasers and biological tissue/eyes
  • Laser Safety Standards
  • Laser safety hazard risks and mitigation
  • Classification of different types of lasers

Learning outcomes:

  • Differentiate lasers from normal light sources
  • Identify the atomic and molecular processes involved in producing a laser
  • Categorise the interactions between lasers and biological tissue/eyes
  • Identify and mitigate risks and hazards on the use of lasers.
  • Articulate and explain the laser safety terminologies specified in the Aus/NZ Laser Safety Standards (AS/NZS IEC 60825.1:2014)
  • Classify common lasers according to the AS/NZS IEC 60825.1:2014
  • Identify engineering and administrative controls on the design of safe working environment for lasers
  • Prescribe suitable personal protective equipment on the safe use of lasers.
No dates are currently scheduled.


ANU is one of the world’s leading universities, recognised internationally for our teaching excellence and cutting-edge research.  With the support of the Australian Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade (DFAT) the ANU Institute for Climate, Energy and Disaster Solutions (ICEDS) is offering a fully funded course to limited number of successful participants that will provide an understanding of the knowledge required for identifying and defining climate change impacts and vulnerability, development implications, legal frameworks, governance, sectoral contexts and socio-economic rationales underpinning climate change adaptation. Successful participants will acquire knowledge to assist them with evidence-based policy development and reform, as well as enhancing interpretation and analysis skills, and identification of  socio-economic impacts and policy interventions.

The course will be a mix of formal and applied learning, including the development of an Adaptation Action Plan (AAP) that can be implemented at individual, community or institutional scales.

Closing date for applications: Wednesday 14 July

Workloads

The course will be delivered in the form of an intensive 6-week online course. Course activities will occur between 10am and 3pm, with a more specific schedule of activities developed closer to the start date. Each week, participants will be expected to attend:

  • 3 to 4 (1-hour) lectures
  • 1 Group Activity (1-hour)
  • 1-hour of individual work on their AAP, with the option of utilising a 15-minute drop in session, that will be scheduled each week
  • 1-hour interactive session

Course outline

The program will include an interactive  mix of lectures, practical exercises, workshop sessions and discussions groups delivered via six individual week modules. The complexity and intersectionality climate change adaptation and mitigation will be delivered via six modules incorporating economics, ecology, sustainability, governance, regulation, environment, human rights, gender and social inclusiveness.

Week 1 - Why climate change adaptation? Understanding drivers of action: Moving from Science to action

  • Lecture - An introduction to systems thinking; systems analysis and climate change vulnerability assessment, including understanding influence diagrams, coastal systems thinking and adaptation exercise.
  • Group Activity - regarding current stresses and climate change and climate variability - reflecting on sites visited and how to better include marginalized groups in policy.
  • Adaptation Action Plan (AAP) development session.
  • Lecture - What does climate change mean for effective decision making? Climate change and decision making: challenges, tensions and opportunities.
  • Interactive session - Moving from science to practice – implications for action in this session participants will work on visioning exercises (past, current and future) to begin to think about adaptation (incremental and transformative) in ‘real’ world contexts.
  • Lecture - Climate change governance – implications for action. 

Week 2 - Climate change adaptation science

  • Lecture- What is climate change and variability in the Pacific context?
  • Group Activity – Data gaps, consistencies/ inconsistencies and tensions in complex Pacific contexts
  • Lecture - Climate change adaptation is more than data? Working with big and ‘small’ data
  • Lecture - Uncertainties and certainties in forecasts at global and regional scales; how useful are global climate change scenarios and how reliable are regional scale forecasts?
  • Interactive session - Climate change adaptation pathways, co-dependencies and real options.
  • Adaptation Action Plan (AAP) development session.

Week 3 - Sectoral adaptation responses

  • Lecture – Agriculture, fisheries and climate change, food production, security and value chains.
  • Lecture - Health and climate change in high and low-income countries.
  • Group Activity - Identifying complexities in decision making.
  • Lecture - Water management and climate change and other conflicts.
  • Lecture – Climate Change and natural resource management and conservation
  • Group activity- Intersection of climate change and natural resource management issues.
  • Interactive Session - Natural disasters and disaster risk reduction exercise.
  • AAP session 

Week 4 - Integrated adaptation policy responses

  • Lecture - Defining ‘adaptation policy’ and role of institutions.
  • Group exercise - Role of governments at different scales for adaptation.
  • Lecture - International institutions theory and praxis of adaptation
  • Interactive Session - Coastal adaptation and island jurisdictions.
  • Lecture - Different approaches to, ecosystem-based adaptation.
  • Lecture – Onehealth or SDG’s as a framing for integrated climate change adaptation responses.
  • AAP session

Week 5 - Stakeholder and Social inclusion

  • Lecture - Social network theory lecture and practical activity using social network analysis.
  • Group activity - Managing water and water use, stakeholder engagement, industry and marginalised groups (Murray Darling Basin)
  • Lecture - Gender and the climate? How does gender affect people's ability to respond to climate change? How should gender be approached in climate change adaptation plans?
  • Lecture and group activity - Psychology of adapting to climate change
  • AAP sessions

Week 6 - Integration and AAP completion

Group Session - comparison of participants’ assessment of their national adaptation strategies.

  • AAPs final development
  • AAP presentations
  • Closing ceremony and graduation 

Requisite Knowledge

Successful applicants to this course will be mid-career professionals with and English-speaking background, working in Government, NGOs or private business with an interest in issues related to climate change adaptation, mitigation and/or disaster recovery


Learning outcomes

By the end of this course, Participants will:

  • Understand key foundational and advanced concepts and practices required for effective climate change adaptation policy development and implementation, and comprehend the political, socioeconomic, regional and international risks, costs and benefits these may entail;
  • Understand the science behind climate change impact and vulnerability assessment, including data collection and monitoring/surveillance mechanisms for assessing the status of environmental changes;
  • Experience methods and tools for developing and accessing climate change adaptation options with stakeholders;
  • Understand the management of the environment, regulation, and legal aspects of governance as socio-ecological systems in which human behaviour management is an intrinsic component;
  • Identify and critically consider the core components of international and regional legal frameworks, treaties and institutions for responding to climate change for Asia-Pacific policy makers, including adaptation financing
  • Appreciate the complexities of national and regional coordination around climate change adaptation at different scales of governance, from the complexities of effective engagement with traditionally marginalised stakeholders, to the complexities of multi-lateral action;
  • Understand shared challenges and contextual differences in climate change adaptation across Asia and the Pacific and the regional and national legal and policy responses in the region.

Who should enrol

ANU is committed to promoting and supporting gender equality, diversity and inclusiveness. We encourage mid-career professionals working in Government, NGOs or private business on issues related to or interest in climate change adaptation, mitigation and/or disaster recovery from the following eligible countries.

Please Note: Only residents of the following countries are eligible to apply:

  • Cook Islands
  • Federated States of Micronesia
  • Fiji
  • Kiribati
  • Mariana Islands
  • Marshall Islands
  • Micronesia
  • Nauru
  • Niue
  • Palau
  • Papua New Guinea
  • Samoa
  • Solomon Islands
  • Timor Leste
  • Tokelau
  • Tonga
  • Tuvalu
  • Vanuatu

In addition, to complete your application you will need the following documents:

  • Current CV
  • Evidence of an International English Language Testing System (IELTS) score of 6.5 or above, OR
  • Evidence of (certificate) a Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) score of 80 and above
  • Letter of recommendation from Employer
No dates are currently scheduled.

Developed and delivered by ANU Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics in collaboration with ANU institute for Space, this course will run at the beautiful Mount Stromlo Observatory.

Do you work in a government department or industry, incorporating and using space technology more? Are you expected to know a range of technical details and nuances and want to better grasp them?  We are here to help!

Course outline

Over 2 days, come and learn from world experts covering a range of areas:

  • history of Australia's role in space,
  • the international landscape
  • how orbits work
  • ground-space communications
  • earth and space observations
  • legal, policy, and security issues
  • space exploration

Hosts

Learning outcomes

By the end of this course you should:

  • Understand space technology and its use
  • have an appreciation of the complexity of space technology
  • be able to identify the key issues in the use and development of space technology
  • understand how various issues are inter-connected and their affects
  • see the need and role of Australia in space technology, especially in the government and private sectors

Who should enrol

This course is suitable for those working in areas involving the use of space, space technology, satellites, earth observations and more.  It is also suitable for anyone interested in learning about the field or potentially entering it.